Category Archives: Scripts

How to restore a table from a Full backup using Quest Litespeed without restoring the entire database

In this article I will demonstrate how we can restore a table from a SQL Server database backup file which has been taken by Quest Litespeed tool. This feature called Object level recovery in the tool is extremely helpful as you need not restore the entire database and yet retrieve data from the backup. Follow the below mentioned steps and understand how this can be accomplished. I will be using a trial copy of Quest Litespeed along with SQL server 2012 and the database we would use is Adventureworks2012. However you can use SQL server 2008 also.

Step 1: Create a database and take a full backup of the database
Let us create a database for this purpose

CREATE DATABASE MyDB
GO
USE mydb
GO
CREATE TABLE Mytable1
( id INT,FNAME NVARCHAR(50) )
GO
INSERT INTO Mytable1 VALUES (1,'Sanchayan')
GO
INSERT INTO Mytable1 VALUES (2,'Abhishek')
go
CREATE TABLE Mytable2
( id INT,LNAME NVARCHAR(50) )
GO
INSERT INTO Mytable2 VALUES (1,'Pandit')
GO
INSERT INTO Mytable2 VALUES (2,'Agrawal')
go

Now take a Full Backup of the database.

exec master.dbo.xp_backup_database
@database = N'Mydb',
@compressionlevel = 3,
@filename = N'D:\MSSQL\SQLBackup\Mydb.bak',
@init = 0,
@OLRMAP = 1--This is important as this marks the backup for object level recovery
GO

Step 2: Now run the following code to find the Tables available in the backup

Use Master
go
exec xp_objectrecovery_viewcontents
@FileName = N'D:\MSSQL\SQLBackup\mydb.bak',
@FileNumber = 1,
@Type = 'All',
@DisableLogProcessing = 1

olr1
Step 3: Now select the table that you wish to restore. In this demo we would restore MyTable2.
We would need the below predefined:
a) The database where we would restore the table.
b) A temp directory location which should be large enough for the table to be restored initially.

Use master
go
exec xp_objectrecovery
@FileName = N'D:\MSSQL\SQLBackup\Mydb.bak',
@FileNumber = 1,
@ObjectName = N'dbo.Mytable2',
@DestinationTable = N'[dbo].[Mytable2]',
@DestinationDatabase = N'MyTempDB',
@DestinationServer = N'GN-A-MOOKBO-7L\sql2012',
@TempDirectory = N'D:\MSSQL\SQLBackup',
@DisableLogProcessing = 1

The output of the above code would be as below
olr2To verify if the data you can query the table that we restored on mytempdb database
olr3I hope this article was helpful in understanding how we can use ‘Object level recovery’ to fetch data from a full backup file that has been taken using Quest Litespeed for SQL Server tool.

Technical reference: http://www.quest.com/litespeed-for-sql-server/

How to Partition a table in SQL Server

In this article we will see how we can partition a table in a database using T-SQL. We will first understand the basics of table partitioning in SQL Server and then go through the scripts that we will use to build a partitioned table. Let us start with the basics of partitioning.

What is table partitioning in SQL Server?
Partitioning is dividing a large table and its indexes into smaller fragments called partitions.

Some of the Benefits?
Its helps performing maintenance operation fragment by fragment basis rather that performing on the entire table. Apart from that SQL queries can be redirected to proper partitions directly rather than scanning the entire table.SQL queries that are properly filtered on the partition column can perform better by making use of partition elimination and parallelism. Archiving data is another major benefit of partitioning. We will not deep dive in this article on the benefits of partitioning.

Components of Partitioning:
1) Partition Function(PF): PF defines which rows goes into what partition in a partitioned table based on a range.
2) Partition Scheme(PS):The partition scheme defines how partitions will be stored on filegroups. Creating a partition scheme assumes that your database already has filegroups.

Let us now understand with an example how we can partition a table in SQL server.
1) Creating a database:

USE master
GO
CREATE DATABASE PartitionDB
ON PRIMARY (NAME = N'PartitionDB'
,FILENAME = N'D:\MSSQL\Data\PartitionDB.mdf'
,SIZE = 50MB, FILEGROWTH = 150MB)
LOG ON (
NAME = N'PartitionDB_log'
,FILENAME = N'D:\MSSQL\Logs\PartitionDB_log.ldf'
,SIZE = 10MB, FILEGROWTH = 100MB);
GO

2) Adding 4 new filegroups to the PartitionDB database.

ALTER DATABASE PartitionDB ADD FILEGROUP PartitionFG1;
GO
ALTER DATABASE PartitionDB ADD FILEGROUP PartitionFG2;
GO
ALTER DATABASE PartitionDB ADD FILEGROUP PartitionFG3;
GO
ALTER DATABASE PartitionDB ADD FILEGROUP PartitionFG4;
GO

3) Adding files to the database filegroups.

 ALTER DATABASE PartitionDB
    ADD FILE
    (
        NAME = PartitionFile1,
        FILENAME = 'D:\MSSQL\Data\PartitionFile1.ndf',
        SIZE = 20MB, MAXSIZE = 50MB, FILEGROWTH = 5MB
    )
    TO FILEGROUP PartitionFG1;
GO
 ALTER DATABASE PartitionDB
    ADD FILE
    (
        NAME = PartitionFile2,
        FILENAME = 'D:\MSSQL\Data\PartitionFile2.ndf',
        SIZE = 20MB, MAXSIZE = 50MB, FILEGROWTH = 5MB
    )
    TO FILEGROUP PartitionFG2;
GO
 ALTER DATABASE PartitionDB
    ADD FILE
    (
        NAME = PartitionFile3,
        FILENAME = 'D:\MSSQL\Data\PartitionFile3.ndf',
        SIZE = 20MB, MAXSIZE = 50MB, FILEGROWTH = 5MB
    )
    TO FILEGROUP PartitionFG3;
GO

 

 ALTER DATABASE PartitionDB
    ADD FILE
    (
        NAME = PartitionFile4,
        FILENAME = 'D:\MSSQL\Data\PartitionFile4.ndf',
        SIZE = 20MB, MAXSIZE = 50MB, FILEGROWTH = 5MB
    )
    TO FILEGROUP PartitionFG4;
GO

4) Creating a Partition Function(PF):

 CREATE PARTITION FUNCTION PartFunc1 (int)
    AS RANGE LEFT FOR VALUES (10, 20, 30);
GO

5) Creating a Partition Scheme(PS):

CREATE PARTITION SCHEME PartScheme1
    AS PARTITION PartFunc1
    TO (PartitionFG1, PartitionFG2,PartitionFG3,PartitionFG4);
GO

6) Create a Table:–

USE [PartitionDB]
GO
CREATE TABLE PartitionTable
	(
	MyID int NOT NULL,
	MyDate datetime NULL,
	Name varchar(50) NULL
	)  ON PartScheme1(MyID)
GO

7) Create Index on Partitioned Table

USE PartitionDB
go
CREATE UNIQUE CLUSTERED INDEX IX_PartitionTable
ON PartitionTable(MyID)
ON PartScheme1 (MyID);
GO

8) Insert Data into the Table

USE PartitionDB
go
INSERT INTO PartitionTable (MyID, MyDate,name)
VALUES (1,GETDATE(),'Rooney');
INSERT INTO PartitionTable (MyID, MyDate,name)
VALUES (11,GETDATE(),'Van persie');
INSERT INTO PartitionTable (MyID, MyDate,name)
VALUES (22,GETDATE(),'De Gea');
INSERT INTO PartitionTable (MyID, MyDate,name)
VALUES (34,GETDATE(),'Moyes');
GO

9) Verify data in the table

SELECT * FROM dbo.partitiontable

10) Verify Rows Inserted in Partitions

USE PartitionDB
go
SELECT * FROM sys.partitions
WHERE OBJECT_NAME(OBJECT_ID)='partitiontable';
GO

P1
11) Run the below code to see the details of the partitioned table

USE PartitionDB
GO
SELECT
OBJECT_NAME(idx.object_id) AS TableName ,
psh.name AS PartitionSchemeName ,
fnc.name AS PartitionFunctionName,
part.partition_number AS PartitionNumber ,
fg.name AS [Filegroup],
rows AS 'No of Records' ,
CASE boundary_value_on_right WHEN 1 THEN 'less than'
ELSE 'less than or equal to' END AS 'Condition',
value AS 'Range' ,
part.partition_id AS [Partition Id] FROM sys.partitions part
JOIN sys.indexes idx
ON part.object_id = idx.object_id
AND part.index_id = idx.index_id JOIN sys.partition_schemes psh
ON psh.data_space_id = idx.data_space_id
JOIN
sys.partition_functions fnc
ON fnc.function_id = psh.function_id LEFT
JOIN sys.partition_range_values prv
ON fnc.function_id = prv.function_id
AND part.partition_number = prv.boundary_id
JOIN sys.destination_data_spaces dds
ON dds.partition_scheme_id = psh.data_space_id
AND dds.destination_id = part.partition_number
JOIN sys.filegroups fg
ON dds.data_space_id = fg.data_space_id
JOIN (SELECT container_id, sum(total_pages) as total_pages
FROM
sys.allocation_units GROUP BY container_id) AS au
ON au.container_id = part.partition_id JOIN sys.tables t ON
part.object_id = t.object_id WHERE idx.index_id < 2
ORDER BY TableName,part.partition_number;
GO

P2 I hope this article was helpful in understanding how we can create table partitions via T-SQL.

Script to find the size of all Indexes in a database

Continuing with my interest with Indexes, i wrote this script that finds the size of all indexes in a database along with the table and the filegroup on which the index resides. I have used the AdventureWorks2012 database as an example. Please replace the DB name for which you want to find the information.

USE AdventureWorks2012
go
IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#Indexdata', 'U') IS NOT NULL
DROP TABLE #Indexdata

DECLARE
@SizeofIndex BIGINT, @IndexID INT,
@NameOfIndex nvarchar(200),@TypeOfIndex nvarchar(50),
@ObjectID INT,@IsPrimaryKey INT,
@FGroup VARCHAR(20)

create table #Indexdata (name nvarchar(50),
IndexID int, IndexName nvarchar(200),
SizeOfIndex int, IndexType nvarchar(50),
IsPrimaryKey INT,FGroup VARCHAR(20))
DECLARE Indexloop CURSOR FOR
SELECT idx.object_id, idx.index_id, idx.name, idx.type_desc
,idx.is_primary_key,fg.name
FROM sys.indexes idx
join sys.objects so
on idx.object_id = so.object_id JOIN sys.filegroups fg
ON idx.data_space_id = fg.data_space_id
where idx.type_desc != 'Heap'
and so.type_desc not in ('INTERNAL_TABLE','SYSTEM_TABLE')

OPEN Indexloop

FETCH NEXT FROM Indexloop
INTO @ObjectID, @IndexID, @NameOfIndex,
@TypeOfIndex,@IsPrimaryKey,@FGroup

WHILE (@@FETCH_STATUS = 0)
BEGIN
SELECT @SizeofIndex = sum(avg_record_size_in_bytes * record_count)
FROM sys.dm_db_index_physical_stats(DB_ID(),@ObjectID,
@IndexID, NULL, 'detailed')

insert into #Indexdata(name, IndexID, IndexName, SizeOfIndex,
IndexType,IsPrimaryKey,FGroup)
SELECT TableName = OBJECT_NAME(@ObjectID),
IndexID = @IndexID,
IndexName = @NameOfIndex,
SizeOfIndex = CONVERT(DECIMAL(16,1),(@SizeofIndex/(1024.0 * 1024))),
IndexType = @TypeOfIndex,
IsPrimaryKey = @IsPrimaryKey,
FGroup = @FGroup

FETCH NEXT FROM Indexloop
INTO @ObjectID, @IndexID, @NameOfIndex,
 @TypeOfIndex,@IsPrimaryKey,@FGroup
END
CLOSE Indexloop
DEALLOCATE Indexloop

select name as TableName, IndexName, IndexType,
SizeOfIndex AS [Size of index(MB)],
case when IsPrimaryKey = 1 then 'Yes' else 'No' End as [IsPrimaryKey]
,FGroup AS [File Group]
from #Indexdata order by SizeOfIndex DESC

Snapshot of the output below:
Indexsize

Find Top 5 executed queries ordered by execution count

I wrote this query that helps us find executed queries with most number of execution counts. The DMV that we have used in this script is sys.dm_exec_query_stats and the function that we have used is sys.dm_exec_sql_text.

SELECT TOP 5 SQLtxt.text AS 'SQL',
qstats.execution_count 
AS 'Execution Count',
qstats.total_logical_writes/DATEDIFF(second, qstats.creation_time,
GetDate()) AS 'Logical Writes Per Second',
qstats.total_physical_reads AS [Total Physical Reads],
qstats.total_worker_time/qstats.execution_count AS [Average WorkerTime],
qstats.total_worker_time AS 'Total Worker Time',
DATEDIFF(hour, qstats.creation_time,
GetDate()) AS 'TimeInCache in Hours'
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qstats
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(qstats.sql_handle) AS SQLtxt
WHERE SQLtxt.dbid = db_id()
ORDER BY qstats.execution_count DESC

Find Top 5 expensive Queries from a Write IO perspective

Recently i wrote this query that helps us find the most expensive queries from a write IO perspective. The DMV that we have used in this script is sys.dm_exec_query_stats and the function that we have used is sys.dm_exec_sql_text.

SELECT TOP 5 sqltxt.text AS ‘SQL’, qstats.total_logical_writes AS [Total Logical Writes],
qstats.total_logical_writes/DATEDIFF(second, qstats.creation_time, GetDate()) AS ‘Logical Writes Per Second’,
qstats.execution_count AS ‘Execution Count’,
qstats.total_worker_time AS [Total Worker Time],
qstats.total_worker_time/qstats.execution_count AS [Average Worker Time],
qstats.total_physical_reads AS [Total Physical Reads],
DATEDIFF(Hour, qstats.creation_time, GetDate()) AS ‘TimeInCache in Hours’,
qstats.total_physical_reads/qstats.execution_count AS ‘Average Physical Reads’,
db_name(sqltxt.dbid) AS DatabaseName
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qstats
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(qstats.sql_handle) AS sqltxt
WHERE sqltxt.dbid = db_id()
ORDER BY qstats.total_logical_writes DESC

Find Top 5 expensive Queries from a Read IO perspective

The below written query helps us find the most expensive queries from a read IO perspective. The DMV that we have used in this script is sys.dm_exec_query_stats and the function that we have used is sys.dm_exec_sql_text.

SELECT TOP 5 qt.text AS ‘SQL’, qstats.total_physical_reads AS ‘Total Physical Reads’, qstats.total_physical_reads/qstats.execution_count AS ‘Average Physical Reads’,    qstats.execution_count AS ‘Execution Count’,
qstats.total_worker_time/qstats.execution_count AS ‘Average Worker Time’,
qstats.total_worker_time AS ‘Total Worker Time’,
DATEDIFF(Hour, qstats.creation_time, GetDate()) AS ‘AgeInCache In Hours’,  db_name(qt.dbid) AS ‘Database Name’
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qstats
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(qstats.sql_handle) AS qt
WHERE qt.dbid = db_id()
ORDER BY qstats.total_physical_reads DESC

SCOM -TSQL Script – Find active alerts in a SCOM managed environment

I had to write this query as SCOM dashboard doesn’t always give depict a proper view of the open active alerts in the system. This would be helpful for creating reports for SCOM or for monitoring purposes as to which alerts are open and from which management packs.

DROP TABLE #Base_State
Go
SELECT *
INTO #Base_State
from
(
SELECT aa.Id AS [AlertId],aa.TimeRaised AS [RaisedDateTime],
aa.Severity,aa.ResolutionState,
CASE WHEN aa.ResolutionState < 254 THEN
 'Open' ELSE 'closed' END AS Status
,mp.MPName AS [ManagementPack],
mp.ManagementPackId AS [MPID]
 FROM
OperationsManager.
dbo.AlertView (NOLOCK) aa
 LEFT JOIN
 OperationsManager.dbo.RuleView (NOLOCK) Rv
ON aa.MonitoringRuleId = rv.Id
JOIN OperationsManager.dbo.ManagementPack mp
ON rv.ManagementPackId = mp.ManagementPackId
WHERE aa.Severity = 2 AND
 aa.ResolutionState < 254
union
SELECT aa.Id AS [AlertId],aa.TimeRaised AS [RaisedDateTime],aa.Severity,aa.ResolutionState,
CASE WHEN aa.ResolutionState < 254
 THEN 'Open' ELSE 'closed' END AS STATUS,
mp.MPName AS [ManagementPack],
mp.ManagementPackId AS [MPID]
FROM
OperationsManager.dbo.AlertView (NOLOCK) aa JOIN OperationsManager.dbo.MonitorView (NOLOCK) Mv
ON aa.MonitoringRuleId = Mv.Id
 JOIN OperationsManager.dbo.ManagementPack mp
ON mv.ManagementPackId = mp.ManagementPackId
WHERE aa.Severity = 2 AND
 aa.ResolutionState < 254
UNION
SELECT aa.AlertGuid AS [AlertId],aa.RaisedDateTime,
aa.Severity,ars.ResolutionState,
CASE WHEN ars.ResolutionState < 254 THEN
 'Open' ELSE 'closed' END AS STATUS,
mp.ManagementPackSystemName AS [ManagementPack],
mp.ManagementPackVersionIndependentGuid AS [MPID]
FROM OperationsManagerDW.Alert.vAlert (NOLOCK) AA JOIN OperationsManagerDW.Alert.vAlertresolutionstate (NOLOCK) ARS
ON aa.AlertGuid = ARS.AlertGuid JOIN
OperationsManagerDW.[dbo].vRule (NOLOCK) Vr
ON aa.AlertProblemGuid =  Vr.RuleGuid JOIN OperationsManagerDW.dbo.vManagementPack (NOLOCK) Mp
ON vr.ManagementPackRowId =  mp.ManagementPackRowId
WHERE aa.Severity = 2 AND
ars.ResolutionState = 255
union
SELECT aa.AlertGuid AS [AlertId],aa.RaisedDateTime,
aa.Severity,
ars.ResolutionState,
CASE WHEN
 ars.ResolutionState < 254 THEN
 'Open' ELSE 'closed' END AS STATUS,
mp.ManagementPackSystemName AS [ManagementPack],
mp.ManagementPackVersionIndependentGuid AS [MPID]
FROM OperationsManagerDW.Alert.vAlert (NOLOCK) AA JOIN OperationsManagerDW.Alert.vAlertresolutionstate (NOLOCK) ARS
ON aa.AlertGuid = ARS.AlertGuid JOIN
OperationsManagerDW.[dbo].vMonitor (NOLOCK) Vm
ON aa.AlertProblemGuid =  Vm.MonitorGuid JOIN OperationsManagerDW.dbo.vManagementPack (NOLOCK) Mp
ON Vm.ManagementPackRowId =  mp.ManagementPackRowId
WHERE aa.Severity = 2 AND
 ars.ResolutionState = 255
) AS Base

SELECT bs.AlertId,bs.RaisedDateTime,
bs.ResolutionState,bs.Status,
bs.ManagementPack
FROM #Base_State BS
WHERE Bs.Status = 'Open'

 

Scom

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